Residential

A Homeowner’s Guide to Residential Building: Designing a 21st Century Home

Over the past 50 years, the con­struc­tion industry has been one of the slowest to adopt new and emerging tech­nolo­gies, causing a decades-long slowdown within the industry. This lag in pro­duc­tion and inno­va­tion is par­tic­u­lar­ly notice­able in the res­i­den­tial home building sector. 

For res­i­den­tial con­struc­tion, these slowdowns have often meant a rise in costs for both the builder and the homeowner. And despite the price increase, many home­own­ers still don’t get the features that should be hallmarks of a modern 21st century home. 

Today’s new homes should be built using modern design inno­va­tions that provide a higher quality of life, comfort and safety instead of relying on typical practices made popular in the 19th century. 

How a Building System Defines Your Home

There are many con­sid­er­a­tions that go into building a high-tech home that will be a sound invest­ment and a long-term ownership expe­ri­ence that is positive and rewarding. One of the most important com­po­nents to consider is the wall system. 

Under construction green

The wall system you choose for your home will play a major role in its longevity and provide you with a com­fort­able, healthy and safe living envi­ron­ment. While wood frame con­struc­tion remains a popular choice through­out the United States, there are sig­nif­i­cant issues with its cost, struc­tur­al integrity and resilience which you can read more about here.

Composite insu­lat­ing concrete form (ICF) wall systems are a great example of a cost-effective wall system designed to outlast and out­per­form wood frame con­struc­tion. Let’s explore a few addi­tion­al ways using ICF con­struc­tion will help you ensure you’re building a 21st century home that will serve as a sanctuary for you and your family for years – even gen­er­a­tions – to come.

The Smart Choice for Modern Homes

One popular example of an ICF wall system is the Bautex Wall System, a single inte­grat­ed system used in next-gen­er­a­tion” homes that creates a con­tin­u­ous grid of concrete columns and beams. 

Concrete columns

These blocks stay in place after the pour to become the enclosure and the insu­la­tion for homes. This simple, inte­grat­ed system replaces the complex mix of materials required for wood frame con­struc­tion and provides you with several benefits that con­ven­tion­al light con­struc­tion cannot: 

  1. Cost Effec­tive­ness: The sim­plic­i­ty, reduction in trades and labor and speed of con­struc­tion make this wall system an afford­able way to build modern homes. These homes are also less costly to operate and maintain and offer increased long-term value to their owners.
  2. Health and Comfort: This wall system is moisture-resistant, fire-resistant, disaster-resistant and pest-resistant. It also offers a higher level of energy effi­cien­cy and noise reduction and is an overall healthier option compared to wood frame construction.
  3. Safety and Pro­tec­tion: Often used in resilient design, this wall system follows national building codes for water, earth­quake, storm and fire resistance.

Limitless Design Options

A great advantage of building homes using ICF con­struc­tion is design flex­i­bil­i­ty. While the walls of an ICF home plan are wider (10 inches) than the walls of a wood-framed home plan (about 4 – 6 inches), there are no lim­i­ta­tions on home designs using ICFs. 

ICFs are easy to shape and cut, making them an ideal choice for custom-designed homes that boast special features like cathedral ceilings, oversized openings, curved walls, long ceiling spans and custom angles. 

From the most practical to the more creative and modern designs, ICFs have the capa­bil­i­ty to deliver the same high level of strength and flex­i­bil­i­ty to any home. There are several case studies and project spot­lights available that highlight the many ways the Bautex is used for res­i­den­tial homes.

Limitless Design Options

A great advantage of building homes using ICF con­struc­tion is design flex­i­bil­i­ty. While the walls of an ICF home plan are wider (10 inches) than the walls of a wood-framed home plan (about 4 – 6 inches), there are no lim­i­ta­tions on home designs using ICFs. 

ICFs are easy to shape and cut, making them an ideal choice for custom-designed homes that boast special features like cathedral ceilings, oversized openings, curved walls, long ceiling spans and custom angles. 

From the most practical to the more creative and modern designs, ICFs have the capa­bil­i­ty to deliver the same high level of strength and flex­i­bil­i­ty to any home. There are several case studies and project spot­lights available that highlight the many ways the Bautex is used for res­i­den­tial homes.

Quick Project Start Times

Start times

There is no spe­cial­ized labor, equipment, training or cer­ti­fi­ca­tions needed to install an ICF like the Bautex Wall System, which can really speed up a project’s start time. This wall system can be easily installed by a variety of trades including framers, masons, concrete crews and general-purpose crews. 

While no special training is required, there is an instal­la­tion training course and other support available to ensure con­struc­tion crews under­stand the general practices, rules and known shortcuts to help make the entire instal­la­tion process go smoothly. Builders also have direct, personal access to Bautex’s team of experts in Technical Services and Builder Support.

An Affordable Choice Now and In The Future

When con­sid­er­ing the upfront costs to build and the potential future savings asso­ci­at­ed with your new home, ICBs like the Bautex Wall System save you money in both the short- and long-term. 

As mentioned above, the costs asso­ci­at­ed with the con­struc­tion phase of your home can be lowered through the reduction of spe­cial­ized labor and the use of easy-to-install materials. In the long-term, high-quality building materials like ICFs have many distinct advan­tages when it comes to savings. 

Building with Bautex saves money over time by reducing energy use and lowering, if not elim­i­nat­ing, replace­ment, repair and main­te­nance expenses. That’s why homes built with these materials retain their value much longer compared to tra­di­tion­al homes with wood framing.